#8 Newsletter, 2022

#8 Newsletter, 2022

Rāmere, te 1 o Aperira 2022

Even superheroes need food, water, sleep, shelter, relaxation, mindfulness and fun!

Caring for yourself as a teacher is like being on an aeroplane that needs oxygen supply, “Put your own mask on before helping someone else”.  If we don’t look after ourselves it can be a struggle to support and nurture our tamariki. We all know about the food pyramid, so how about a wellbeing pyramid.  This simple, yet effective pyramid prioritises how we can look after our wellbeing.  Of course, there are ample other things we could add, but this is a fantastic visual to print out and put on the fridge, to give us a quick reminder to take care of our own wellbeing.  

 𝓐𝓬𝓽𝓲𝓸𝓷 𝓒𝓸𝓶𝓹𝓮𝓽𝓮𝓷𝓬𝓮 

𝕎𝕙𝕒𝕥 𝕚𝕤 𝔸𝕔𝕥𝕚𝕠𝕟 ℂ𝕠𝕞𝕡𝕖𝕥𝕖𝕟𝕔𝕖?

The action competence learning process is a process for engaging environmental problem solving.

It provides a framework that enables students to take individual or collective action. 

The term “action competence” means the development of those competencies (understandings and skills) that enable students to take critical action. 

The issue selected for action should be one that students have chosen so that it has meaning and relevance for them. Issues will emerge out of the themes or contexts that are currently being studied.

𝑯𝒐𝒘 𝑨𝒄𝒕𝒊𝒐𝒏 𝑪𝒐𝒎𝒑𝒆𝒕𝒆𝒏𝒄𝒆 𝒄𝒂𝒏 𝒃𝒆 𝒖𝒔𝒆𝒅 𝒊𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝑪𝒍𝒂𝒔𝒔𝒓𝒐𝒐𝒎

An action competence framework is an essential tool to provide the scaffolding necessary to foster our role as guardians of the planet.  

Action Competence is a useful framework to empower students to get involved and address complex environmental issues. 

Students are able to develop skills to:

  • Critically evaluate the problems facing our planet
  • Gain a deep understanding of the environmental issues that are affecting our world 
  • Analyse the challenges affecting our ability to live in a thriving society
  • Know that they can make a difference and take action to lead a change
  • Make links to our community
  • Recognise the importance of digital technology as a tool to take action

Action Competence in Senior Secondary

Action Competence in Primary School

Local Area PLD Rocks

On the Saturday 30th August there is the opportunity to attend an excursion to learn about the local geology of Ōrewa and other significant locations on the North Shore with renowned local geologist Dr Bruce Hayward. 

If you’re interested in attending please contact Matt Harrison: m.harrison@orewakahuiako 

He Kemu Hou – Follow Mana on his quest and earn pounamu on the way!

If you haven’t come across it yet, a  kemu/game is out for tamariki to learn te reo Māori and it’s a lot of fun. 

Developers, The AFED Squad, have a number of games that support the learning including te reo Māori via the website, https://afedsquad.co.nz/glims/

Players complete quests with Mana, a warrior who has come back from the future to save te reo Māori. Each quest involves watching short videos and answering pātai/questions which earn players pounamu credits. 

There are a number of topics covered at level 1 and more content on the horizon. This isn’t a one-stop program that you can rely on for teaching the level 1 curriculum but it is a fun tool that can run in conjunction with your explicit teaching to support learning and build engagement.

To get a feel for it, you’re just going to have a play with it yourself. 

Spotlight – Althea White (Mrs White) at Orewa College

Kia ora,  I am in the Te ao Māori group and my goal is to encourage and foster the normalisation of Te Reo in the classroom.  To this end, I have enrolled in the Te Ahu o te Reo Māori with Takatū course. 

My goal is to reach a level of proficiency in te reo Māori which will give me the confidence to meet with colleagues and make suggestions that will benefit our kura. 

The purpose is also to complement the work that is being done from years 1 to 8, to ensure continuity. So for the moment, this involves creating resources that will give teachers opportunities to use greetings, instructions, and common classroom phrases and whakataukī in the classroom.

The photo below is symbolic of my goal to be part of the tree that provides shelter for the birds as they fly on their journey towards understanding their cultural significance and becoming comfortable with using Te Reo Māori in our kura. 

Kia ora,  I am in the Te ao Māori group and my goal is to encourage and foster the normalisation of Te Reo in the classroom.  To this end, I have enrolled in the Te Ahu o te Reo Māori with Takatū course. 

My goal is to reach a level of proficiency in te reo Māori which will give me the confidence to meet with colleagues and make suggestions that will benefit our kura. 

The purpose is also to complement the work that is being done from years 1 to 8, to ensure continuity. So for the moment this involves creating resources that will give teachers opportunities to use greetings, instructions and common classroom phrases and whakataukī in the classroom.

SPOTLIGHT – Silverdale School

We have used edpuzzle in our class as an independent comprehension follow up for whole class books and the kids love it! It’s been a great way to independently extend all of the children in our class as it is accessible for everyone. Those children who struggle more with reading and writing have the option to record their answers for some questions. The kaiako making the video also has the option to add voice notes, we have added voice notes in which we read aloud the question before it pops up. 

You can choose between multi-choice questions as well as open-ended ones which give the opportunity to practice literal comprehension as well as things like predicting and more inferential skills. So far, we have only used it for reading, but it would be easy to use in other areas too!

Teacher View:

Student View:

Teach Thought – Technology

Article – It’s Not About The Apps, It’s About The Pedagogy

contributed by Allan Carrington, TeachThought PD Workshop Facilitator

Visit TeachThought Professional Development if you’re interested in our workshop options on the Padagogy Wheel.

The Padagogy Wheel is designed to help educators think – systematically, coherently, and with a view to long term, big-picture outcomes – about how they use mobile apps in their teaching. The Padagogy Wheel is all about mindsets; it’s a way of thinking about digital-age education that meshes together concerns about mobile app features, learning transformation, motivation, cognitive development and long-term learning objectives.

The Padagogy Wheel, though, is not rocket science. It is an everyday device that can be readily used by everyday teachers; it can be applied to everything from curriculum planning and development, to writing learning objectives and designing centered activities. The idea is for the users to respond to the challenges that the Wheel presents for their teaching practices, and to ask themselves the tough questions about their choices and methods.

The underlying principle of the Padagogy Wheel is that it is the pedagogy that should determine our educational use of apps. It’s all very well to come across an exciting new app and to think to yourself, ‘That’s really cool, now how can I use it in the classroom?,’ but what you need to do at the same time is to think about how that app might contribute to your set of educational aims for the program you are teaching. It was in fact this very concern, my desire to help teachers make good decisions as to how to make the pedagogy drive the technology, and not the other way around, that led to the birth of the Padagogy Wheel.

So how does it work?

The Padagogy Wheel brings together in the one chart several different domains of pedagogical thinking. It situates mobile apps within this integrated framework, associating them with the educational purpose they are most likely to serve. It then enables teachers to identify the pedagogical place and purpose of their various app-based learning and teaching activities in the context of their overall objectives for the course, and with reference to the wider developmental needs of their students.

Gears_large

It’s useful to see the Wheel as providing a series of challenges and questions, a structured set of prompts asking you to reflect on your teaching, from planning to implementation. These prompts are interconnected like mechanical gears where a decision in one area often affects decisions in other areas. Consider each area as a grid through which you filter what you are doing. There are five of these grids; let’s look at each one in more detail.

Read more – THE FIVE GRIDS

Kāhui Ako Hui Dates – Term One 2022

7th April – Online – 9.30pm Across School Leaders

Kāhui Ako Hui Dates – Term Two 2022

5th May – Orewa Beach School – 11am ASL

5th May – Orewa College – 3.30pm ASL and WSL

12th May – Orewa College – 10.15am ASL

19th May – Dairy Flat School – 11am ASL

19th May – Orewa College – 3.30pm ASL and WSL

26th May – Orewa Primary – 10.35am ASL

2nd June – Wainui School – 10.10am ASL

2nd June – Orewa College – 3.30pm ASL and WSL

9th June – Silverdale School – 11.05am ASL

16th May – Orewa Beach School – 11am ASL

16th June – Orewa College – 3.30pm ASL and WSL

23rd June – Orewa College – 10.15am ASL

30th June – Dairy Flat School – 11am ASL

30th June – Orewa College – 3.30pm ASL and WSL

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