#24 Weekly Update

16 Friday, August 2019

Rāmere, te 16 o Hereturikōkā 2019

In this week’s update:

  1. Tuhituhi/ Writing update and useful links
  2. Professional reading – All about writing
  3. Ngaio pukapuka kōrero – All about pronunciation
  4. Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group – Managing student behaviour
  5. Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Group – A play with VR
  6. Podcast number 6: Exercising our empathy muscles

We are looking forward to our combined Orewa Kahui Ako after school hui on the 22nd August at Orewa College, with Hana O’Regan. Details have been sent to all schools.

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1. Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Focus Group

This week our writing focus group begins work on our two tasks in our after school meeting:

1. NZC Levels 1 – 5 . Developing scaffolded expectations (anchor charts) that can be used to support instruction across the curriculum

2. Orewa Kāhui LPF matrix – Revisit our matrix to look at the content detail and modify where needed. Developing a LPF matrix in ‘student speak’

We are looking forward to sharing our progress with you, but are aware that we have a large task ahead of us. We hope that can provide useful support material for both students and teachers that is common across our kura. Please join us if you would like to be part of this development in our afterschool fortnightly meetings.

Useful writing sites

Write the World offers a range of tools and resources to help you create a vibrant writing community within your classroom. As educators ourselves, we understand the exciting (and challenging) task of engaging young people in the writing process. We also understand how little time teachers have when it comes to finding fresh material, developing resources, and implementing creative writing into an already packed curriculum. At Write the World you can give your students both. This is an ideal platform for blended learning or a flipped-classroom. Write the World encourages students to carefully consider not only what and how they write, but the universality of what they feel as their audience is global.

Creative classroom- Strategies to Engage Reluctant Writers

John Spencer

We’ve all seen it before. You assign a writing task and you have students who write two sentences. Some are scared to get started. Others are convinced that writing is boring. Still, others are struggling and don’t know where to start. So, how do we engage these reluctant writers? Follow the link here to John Spencer’s 10 Teacher-Tested Strategies to Engage Reluctant Writers. A podcast is also available at this link. PODCAST Link on this site

2. Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading 

A TEACHING AND LEARNING CYCLE

Beverly Derewianka from the University of Wollongong has developed a teaching-learning cycle based on the notion of having high expectations supported by strong scaffolding and explicit teaching. It is based on Vygotskian principles of learning through interaction with more proficient others in the context of shared experience. The activities are carefully ordered to build up students’ knowledge and abilities so that they can experience success. It is not, however, intended as a strict sequence – teachers will move between stages of the cycle as needed.

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In particular, the teacher:

• identifies the language demands of the task

• explicitly teaches students the genres needed for success in schooling

• is concerned with deep learning of content together with learning the

language of the content area

• makes explicit the learning intention and success criteria for each stage of the cycle

• constantly assesses students’ progress at each stage of the cycle and responds to identified needs

A more detailed explanation of the process can be found here as well as a link to the resources in detail here.

3. Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Top tip for normalising te reo Māori!: Pronouncing place names correctly

Spending time going over local place names with our students is a valuable exercise that can lead to discussions around respecting te reo Māori, the importance of trying, the Māori vowel system. There are plenty of local place names that are commonly mispronounced to start the journey, from Orewa through to Whangaparaoa.

Learning to pronounce place names can be the beginning of your te reo journey. Take Taupo for instance:

Taupo

Not Towel – Po

But more like Toe – paw ✔️

There is a great video on youtube that can be used as a hook at the start of a lesson.

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4. Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

Student behaviour can be one of the most difficult areas of school life for teachers to deal with. The next few weeks will focus on understanding some specific reasons for behaviour and what could be going on internally vs externally. We will look at ways to understand behaviours and how to respond to them.

5. Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Group

This week we discussed the LPFs in greater detail and reminded ourselves to always go back to the curriculum document. We touched on the continuum of where schools are at with regard to implementing the 2020 Digital Curriculum, but ran out of time to discuss fully. In addition, we had some fun with the VR gear. In particular, teachers seemed to enjoy having a go with the VR version of Google Earth.

6. Podcast number 6: Link here

This week: how to exercise our empathetic muscles. Empathy is like a muscle — it can be strengthened with exercise and it can atrophy when idle. On this episode of Hidden Brain, we talk about calibrating our empathy so we can interact with others more mindfully.

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

                                         UPCOMING:

# 23 Weekly Update

Friday 9 August 2019

Rāmere, te  9 o Hereturikōkā 2019

In this week’s update:

  1. Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori: Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori/ Māori Language Week
  2. Ngaio pukapuka kōrero/ Professional Development: Hana O’Regan
  3. Rōpū Tuhituhi/ Writing Group: Keeping children Engaged and Achieving in Writing
  4. Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group: Engaging Reluctant Learners
  5.  Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Group: Maths Made Easy Workshops: Jo Knox and Marie Hirst
  6. Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading: Community of Kapa Haka – AKO Magazine Hōtoke/ Winter
  7. Podcast number 6: Tunnel Vision

1. Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Screen Shot 2019-08-08 at 1.08.45 PMIn week 8 of this term, Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori is being celebrated in Aotearoa. Across the kura of Kāhui Ako Orewa we are busy organising activities that engage and challenge our kaimahi/ staff, akona/ students and communities.

If you have any ideas that you or your kura have done or will be doing and would be willing to share, please send them through to markralston@silverdaleprimary.school.nz so that we can share them far and wide. Together we aim to support, encourage and promote Te Reo Māori in ways that are authentic and can be carried on beyond the seven-day event.

He mauri te reo Māori nō Aotearoa māu, mā tātou katoa

Make te reo Māori an essential part of New Zealand for you, for us all

2. Ngaio pukapuka kōrero/ Professional Development

Hana updated

3. Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Focus Group

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In May this year an ERO publication on Keeping children Engaged and Achieving in Writing was released. Over the next few updates we will share more of the findings and strategies presented. Approaches and strategies observed in successful writing programmes is particularly encouraging for our Kāhui Ako focus group.

  • Working closely with parents to help them understand what the child was learning at school and; to determine the child’s interests and achievements at home and how these interests could further contribute to the child’s writing.
  • Working with the secondary school most children went to next to find out how well writing programmes were preparing children for their next stage in learning. ( L.P.F. focus for our Kāhui Ako and focus for writing group)
  • Sharing the teaching approaches between the primary and secondary schools to help teachers in each school understand what came before and what came next for children as they developed as confident writers. ( L.P.F. focus for our Kāhui Ako)
  • Making clear for children the links between reading, speaking and writing. In some cases, oral language had a significant focus during the writing programme. In other instances young children’s learning about letter formation, sounds and words were deliberately combined as part of early reading and writing teaching strategies
  • Deliberately emphasising the craft of writing to help children better organise their ideas. Children made considerable progress through learning more about the structure of a sentence, a paragraph, and an essay (focus for writing group this term)
  • Carefully planning learning activities across the breadth of the curriculum to reinforce new writing skills, and making sure children understood how to apply strategies learned during writing time to all writing activities across the school day. (focus for writing group this term)

A reminder for our Across Schools moderation in week 8, Term 3.

Aspects for moderation: Text type – Information Report

  • Using writing to think and organise for learning
  • Creating texts to communicate current knowledge and understanding
  • Writing meaningful text: vocabulary knowledge

Please send your writing samples to sblackburn@wainui.school.nz by Monday 26th August, week 6.

4. Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

Sometimes it is hard to reach that one student who just doesn’t seem to be happy, want to be at school, or looks alone. Sometimes they are reluctant to engage or learn. It is easy for them to lean against a wall and disappear to another land.

Here are some tips on how to engage with these reluctant learners:

5. Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Group

Professional development run by Marie Hirst and Jo Knox:

Term 3 Maths Made Easy Workshops: Please click here to register.

Spaces are filling up fast. See workshop descriptions below for more information

  • Northcross Intermediate: Monday 2nd September OR
  • Orewa Primary School: Wednesday 4th September

Screen Shot 2019-08-08 at 1.09.22 PMScreen Shot 2019-08-08 at 1.09.41 PM

6. Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

AKO Magazine Hōtoke/Winter: Community of Kapa Haka

We have seen first hand the transformation kapa haka can have on a kura when offered to all students. As teachers, we can use resources such as YouTube to offer our students this experience in our classrooms if there is no other option, particularly in the younger years. Below is an article from the Ako magazine that discusses the benefits kapa haka can make to a kura.

“We know from research that children involved in music are academically more successful – (kapa haka) is a super learning tool”

Des Hedley

Link here

7. Podcast number 6:

Podcast link here

When you’re hungry, it can be hard to think of anything other than food. When you’re desperately poor, you may constantly worry about making ends meet. When you’re lonely, you might obsess about making friends. This week’s episode is about the psychological phenomenon of scarcity. Researchers say this form of tunnel vision can affect our ability to see the big picture and cope with problems in our lives.

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING:

# 22 Weekly Update

Friday, 2 August 2019

Rāmere, te 2 o Hereturikōkā, 2019

In this week’s update:

1. Ngaio pukapuka kōrero/ Professional Development: Digital Curriculum

2. Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Group: Rethinking Success Criteria

3. Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori: Kupu you already know

4. Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group: Assisting students

5. Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Group: Maths programme at Dairy Flat School

6. Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading: Teaching as Inquiry

7. Podcast number 5: Students creating podcasts. And Project Based Learning

1. Ngaio pukapuka kōrero/ Professional Development

Orewa Primary are hosting a Kia Takatū ā-Matihiko (the MoE’s National Digital Readiness programme) meetup on September 3rd 2019.

“Brand new to the digital technology curriculum content, not sure where to start? Join us for a fun-filled, hands on session to look at practical ideas to get you started. During this session we will look at both device based and unplugged activities, resources and ideas to implement readily with your students.” Registration details:- Link here

Te wiki o te reo Māori PD: See details below:

2. Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Focus Group

Our focus for our Across Schools moderation has been set for week 8 of Term 3. Aspects for moderation: Text type – Information Report

  • Using writing to think and organise for learning
  • Creating texts to communicate current knowledge and understanding
  • Writing meaningful text: vocabulary knowledge

Please send your writing samples to sblackburn@wainui.school.nz by Monday 26th August, week 6.

Here is an alternative to listed ‘success criteria’ for writing, which we call ‘boxed’ or ‘expanding success criteria.’ It is very easy to adopt, and teachers have been finding that it can transform how writing is talked about and approached in the classroom, with an immediate impact on the quality of what pupils are producing. Follow the link to a blog by James Durran on Re-thinking ‘success criteria’: a simple device to support pupils’ writing

3. Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Māori Language Week

                                                 Monday 9 – Sunday 15 September

‘He mauri te reo Māori nō Aotearoa māu, mā tātou katoa’

‘Make te reo Māori an essential part of New Zealand for you, for us all’

In week 8 of this term, Te Wiki o te Reo Māori is being celebrated up and down Aotearoa. Over the coming weeks, we will be adding ways you can join the celebrations in your classroom and kura. The link above will take you to the official website where resources can be found to upsize your reo.

 

 

Top tip for normalising te reo Māori!: Normalise kupu/ words you already know

One really easy way to normalise te reo in our kura is to start by using the kupu we already know. Words such as hui, kai, kōrero are commonly known by most people these days and by simply using them rather than defaulting to English we make a huge impact towards transformative change with very little effort.

Some examples might be:

“Come to my table for a hui

“I think we need to have a kōrero

“Go and fetch you kai

At first, it may feel a little cheesy but the more you do it, the more comfortable you will feel.

Hui

Noun – gathering, meeting, assembly, seminar, conference.

Verb – to gather, congregate, assemble, meet.

Kōrero

Verb – to tell, say, speak, read, talk, address,

Noun – speech, narrative, story, news, account, discussion, conversation, discourse, statement, information

Kai

Verb – to eat, consume, feed (oneself), partake, devour

Noun – food, meal

4. Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

This is the final section of four major areas in which we can assist our learners.

So far, we have examined, Adapt, Adopt and Modify. This week we look at how we can Assist our students in practical ways. Remember UDL – any strategies (design) we use can assist other students naturally.

Classroom layout can hinder access to resources, work stations, smooth movement, feeling of belonging, interaction and collaboration. These can be physical barriers and/ or emotional barriers.

  • Provide clear physical pathways, spaces to interact and move around
  • Resources at accessible heights
  • Assigning a peer tutor/ buddy can help a student to interact, contribute and record their ideas in a collaborative manner. This enables participation and inclusion as well as a sense of purpose.
  • Technology can play a big role in assistance
    • take photos of learning/ progress,
    • record work in video or images
    • showing videos to demonstrate and repeat processes
    • speak text out
    • record answers
    • share work and contribute to shared documents
    • apps which provide immediate response
    • storage of work, build portfolios to show success rather than grades which can degrade
  • Students can use the microphone key to voice record their responses rather than struggle with typing/ writing.
  • Use highlight and speak text functions on device. Text can be read out to students – accent, speed, volume, pace can all be adjusted to suit the learner.

5. Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Group

We began our first meeting with Fran Earwaker leading us through a discussion on the maths programme at Dairy Flat School. She discussed the Student Profile Learning Progressions and this led to an exploration of the Basic Facts Teaching Coverage that is required. We also had a look at the work of Marie Hirst, in particular at the Basic Facts Diagnostic Tests. Marie Hirst makes the valid point: “Testing basic fact knowledge is always problematic as we want to know whether these facts are known by instant recall rather than by working them out. Hence timing is always an issue.” Fran led a rich and rewarding discussion about maths in our kāhui ako.

6. Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

Without a shared understanding of the role of the teacher and how to leverage the powerful tool that is Teacher Inquiry to create desired learning experiences, you will solely rely on the models of teaching you have always used, despite the resources at your fingertips or those of your students.

Creating an environment where learners are empowered to take risks in pursuit of learning and growth rather than perfection is foundational to shifting educational practices. This statement is often spoken in relation to student learning. I would also challenge you to think of the learning of teachers in your school in this way.

Tabitha Leonard

If you would like to read more on the idea of teaching as inquiry, here is a link to Tabitha Leonard’s website where she examines TAI more closely.

7. Podcast number 5

  • Interested in getting students to create podcasts? For primary schoolers, this website might offer some ideas. And for secondary schoolers, this article might be of benefit to you.

We still need direct instruction within PBL. According to John Hattie’s research, inquiry-based learning had only a .31 effect size on student learning. However, Hattie clarified that inquiry is still vital for learning. Inquiry-based and problem-based learning are ineffective in learning surface-level information. However, they are highly effective in learning deep information. Hattie argues that inquiry should occur after students have gained prior knowledge.

John Spencer

  •  In this link, John Spencer includes a number of interesting podcasts about his research into project based learning, which also includes inquiry-based learning.

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING:

#21 Weekly Update

Friday, 26 July 2019 

Rāmere, te 26 o Hōnongoi, 2019

In this week’s update:

  1. Welcome back
  2. Professional Development opportunity at Orewa Primary
  3. Tuhituhi/ Writing update
  4. Playing traditional Māori hākinakina/ sports
  5. Learner support tips
  6. Pāngarau/Maths group update
  7. Professional reading: 5 Ways To Engage Reluctant Learners
  8. Podcast number 4: From teachers’ nightmare to accomplished educator

1. Welcome to Term 3

We hope you all had a fantastic holiday break and are avoiding the nasty winter bugs around.

This term our across school leaders team will be using the development map tool created by the Ministry of Education to reflect on our Orewa Kāhui Ako progress in our focus areas (Domains of Development.) This will help guide us where we need to head in the future in our journey of collaborative practice and focus areas of Maths, Writing, Te Reo and Learner Support, across our community. Our focus will be on the following Domains, with progress so far defined in four definite stages: establishing, developing, embedding, and fully functioning.

Domain 2: Leading for progress and achievement for every child and every teacher

Domain 4: Pathways developing and connecting along the whole educational journey for every child.

Domain 6: Building a thriving Community of Learning/Kahui Ako

2. Ngaio pukapuka kōrero/ Professional Development

Orewa Primary are hosting a Kia Takatū ā-Matihiko (the MoE’s National Digital Readiness programme) meetup on September 3rd 2019.

“Brand new to the digital technology curriculum content, not sure where to start? Join us for a fun-filled, hands on session to look at practical ideas to get you started. During this session we will look at both device based and unplugged activities, resources and ideas to implement readily with your students.” Registration details:- Link here

3. Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Focus Group

Our Term 3 focus in writing has arisen from our Term 2 writing moderation meeting, where we discussed the need to pursue the following areas:

1. NZC Levels 1 – 5 . Developing scaffolded expectations (anchor charts) that can be used to support instruction across the curriculum

2. Orewa Kāhui LPF matrix – Revisit our matrix to look at the content/ detail and modify where needed. Developing a LPF matrix in ‘student speak’

Please contact Sandy Blackburn sblackburn@wainui.school.nz if you would like to join in on these meetings or have any ideas that you would like us to share.

Do you need to help students to generate their ideas and imagination for story writing? Start the new term with Rory’s Story Cubes. A pocket-sized creative story generator, providing hours of imaginative play for all ages. With Rory’s Story Cubes, anyone can become a great storyteller and there are no wrong answers. Simply roll the cubes and let the pictures spark your imagination! Follow the link to the website here

4. Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Top tip for normalising te reo Māori!:

Playing traditional Māori hākinakina/ sports

Hākinakina/ sport is a fun way to include Māori culture into your practice. Cultural activities that students are fully engaged in and having fun with are worth doing.

Discussions around Māori perspectives on health and well-being, exploring the origins of these games or similarities to games we play today, exposure to new language (Kupu hou) and the opportunity to develop physical skills and fitness can be easily woven into the learning of a game.

This week we trialled a kemu/ game call horo hopu from the r2r website and the students loved it. Before playing, we simply created a giant poi by attaching a rope to a ball, collected bibs from the sports shed and played the video below to the students, and we were away.

 

5. Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

Here is the third installment of what we can do in our classroom to support our learners. Remember UDL (Universal Design for Learning) = whichever strategies we use for one could benefit all in some way.

Modify the ecology (place, space, culture, environment, attitudes, learning barriers)

  • Remove barriers to learning – physical and learning barriers for all
  • Examine what is going on beneath the surface and modify environment accordingly
  • Examine your classroom culture and environment – modify where required
  • Modify factors in activity, task, delivery, expectation, method, output, interaction, collaboration, interest, time and inquiry.
  • Modify the meaning of success as: growth, accepting a challenge, taking a risk, trying again, learning from mistakes, setting and achieving goals (not pass/fail)
  • Demonstrate and nurture attitudes of: acceptance, enthusiasm, determination, positivity, encouragement, success and growth
  • Modify the way you deliver classes – modify so the students can deliver/run/develop activities in the classroom, not teacher talk.
  • Modify the way students can OUTPUT their learning (style, method)
  • Modify tradition to become a growth mindset approach to all students can learn, rather than a fixed mindset
  • ANYTHING you modify can help other students as well (Universal Design for Learning)

6. Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Group

The maths group will continue to share their maths programmes from the individual schools, and progress further along the LPF framework. In addition, we will continue to investigate the 2020 Digital Curriculum. We ended last term with a development of the continuum schools are on with regard to the implementation of the curriculum. It is interesting to share ideas and lesson plans which include both plugged and unplugged activities.

7. Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

5 Ways To Engage Reluctant Learners

Click here for full article : This short one page article has some really user friendly tips which can also serve as a useful reminder of ways to engage our reluctant learners.

8. Podcast number 4

The Wired Educator Podcast begins with an interview with Apple Distinguished Educator, Anthony Johnson. Anthony is a passionate educator and an inspiration to students and teachers alike. He reminds us that great teachers remember what it’s like to be a student. Link to podcast here.

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING:

#20 Weekly Update

Friday, 5 July 2019

Rāmere, te 5 o Hōnongoi, 2019

In this week’s update:

  • Summary of the Kāhui Ako combined board meeting
  • Analysis of our second round of moderation
  • Matariki round up
  • Learner support tips
  • Podcast number 3

As Term 2 draws to an end our Orewa Kāhui Ako grows from strength to strength. Our purpose of building our collaboration and connections between our leaders: Principals, Boards of Trustees, Across School Leaders, Within School Leaders, Teachers and Schools continues to be our strategic intent.

While we are maintaining our focus areas of Maths, Writing, Learner Support and Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori as defined by our school principals, the development maps from the Kāhui Ako toolkit are guiding us in our Kāhui Ako journey, with particular emphasis on the following domains.

Domain 2: Leading for progress and achievement for every child and every teacher

Domain 4: Pathways developing and connecting along the whole educational journey for every child.

Domain 6: Building a thriving Community of Learning/Kāhui Ako

Every educator walking alongside our tamariki has an integral role in this journey and is part of the life of each child of our Kāhui Ako. We can make a difference, beyond our own school gate expanding on a web of interconnected pathways which support the journey of our tamariki. This week was a perfect example of this collaboration when we held our combined Board of Trustees meeting to inform and update school boards of our progress so far. Discussion across the B.O.Ts about the potential for our community of learning was very positive.

Thank you to all who help work towards making our Orewa Kāhui Ako a thriving community. Enjoy a well earned break and see you all next term.

Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Focus Group

Results from our week 8 across school writing moderation have been analysed and is now able to be shared with our community. A full copy of the results can be found here.

A snapshot of the results.

While we still need to work on developing closer alignment the practice of across kura moderation has many benefits.

  • Enriches our understanding of the LPF
  • Provides opportunities for different views to be shared and heard
  • Maintains the focus of discussion on the student samples and the LPF
  • Evidence of learning can be confidently shared
  • Reliable information is used to make teaching and learning decisions, which helps when communicating with other professional agencies
  • Assessment practice improves, made with increased confidence
  • Reliability, validity, and fairness within the process is enhanced, so achievement decisions are defensible.
  • Closer alignment in our teaching and assessment practices

Our focus aspects for our moderation meeting in Term 3, week 8, will be based on the text type – Information Report. Further information will be shared next term,

Aspects

  • Using writing to think and organise for learning
  • Creating texts to communicate current knowledge and understanding
  • Writing meaningful text: vocabulary knowledge

Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Matariki snaps from our kura:

Collaborative Tapa artwork for Matariki Year 7 Orewa College

Matariki Circuit cards Wainui School

Matariki Collaborative Star Displays Wainui School New Entrant

Silverdale School celebrated Matariki by flying kites at Metro Park

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

Here is the second instalment of what we can do in our classroom to support our learners. Remember UDL (Universal Design for Learning) = whichever strategies we use for one could benefit all in some way

Adopt the way you do things:

  • Learn new skills yourself as an educator
  • Implement new skill sets and strategies in your classrooms for a variety of ways to tackle tasks
  • Adopt an attitude and behaviour of collaboration with colleagues in and across schools
  • Include cooperative learning in your classroom
  • Accept various needs and levels of students
  • Have expectations for all students at all levels

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

Teacher Wellbeing

Follow the link here to listen to the podcast about teachers, with teachers and for teachers from the NZ Teaching Council.

Podcast number 3

Average is a myth, so why should it control our lives?

We measure ourselves — and others — against averages all the time. Think GPAs, personality tests, standardised test results, performance review ratings. These are average measures that tell us little about what makes us unique. And this is not just a feel-good argument. It is a mathematical fact.

In his bestselling book, The End of Average: How We Succeed in a World that Values Sameness, researcher, professor, and president of The Centre for Individual Opportunity at Harvard, Todd Rose, explains the history of average and how it became so embedded in our culture. He goes on to explain why now, more than ever, we need to move beyond its impact on our schools and our workplaces.

Podcast link here

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

 

#19 Weekly Update

Friday, 28 June 2019

Rāmere, te 28 o Pipiri, 2019

 

Ngā mihi o te tau hou Māori 

Happy Māori new year

In this week’s update:

  • Introduction to our new strategy for te ao Māori across Kāhui Ako Orewa, putting forward the case of using “matua” and “whaea” in the classroom
  • Summary of Monday’s Learner Support hui
  • Professional development opportunities on teaching Māori
  • Podcast titled “Too much noise?” Does a barrage of noise distract students from deep work?

Matariki at Dairy Flat School

To kick us off, a big, KIA ORA to Fran Earwaker for the photos of her akonga/ students and their kites along with this beautiful image of a Matariki Starry Nightshowing. It’s great to see Matariki alive and well in our kura.

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Strategy document for te ao Māori across Kāhui Ako Orewa, Ko Te Rautaki Reo 2019 a Te Kāhui Ako ki Orewa.

We are excited to announce our strategy document for developing te ao Māori across Kāhui Ako Orewa, Ko Te Rautaki Reo 2019 a Te Kāhui Ako ki Orewa. The strategy was created by our tumuaki/ principals and Māori leaders at our community marae, Te Herenga Waka o Orewa.

This document provides clear achievable steps for leaders and kaiako to implement in order to make transformative change over time.

Link to the document

Top tip o te wiki for normalising te reo Māori:

Consider being called by a different title? In parts of Tāmaki Makaurau, being called “Matua” or “Whaea”, meaning uncle and auntie respectively, would be the norm. Over Te WIki o te reo Māori 2018 we trialled it in our team and personally, we found an increase in respect shown as a result as well as a genuine warmness from students who chose to use it. Hearing, “Matua Mark” or “Whaea Margaret” warmed our hearts so much that we kept it going. Over Matariki, how about trialling swapping Mr. or Mrs. to Matua or Whaea and see how it goes.

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

We had another very productive Learner Support Team hui on Monday. It is always such a fantastic opportunity for our Learner Support Coordinators (SENCO), RTLB, in school leaders and across school leader to gather, discuss, set directions and collaborate. At this hui we were able to test our own school’s new Learner Support Register. We also examined and discussed the Ministry of Education’s action plan for the Learner Support Model.

Let’s take a closer look at what we can do in our classroom to support our learners.

Remember UDL (Universal Design for Learning) = whichever strategies we use for one could benefit all in some way

Adapt the text size – this can be simply:

  • the size of a font,
  • the size of work on the date projector/board
  • the enlarged size of a printed page (A3 rather than A4)

Or adapt:

  • the length/amount of the material
  • The detail/reading level of the material (e.g. shorten text)
  • The level of vocabulary (replace difficult words with simpler alternatives so students still gain meaning)
  • The content maturity or level
  • The task might need to be done a different way or with a peer helper
  • The time it takes a student to complete an activity or task might be longer

The learning environment to suit the student(s)

  • more space between groups of desks,
  • Use peer learning or cooperative learning
  • Provide a quiet space
  • Permission to move around at times
  • An environment where taking risks and making mistakes is ok because we can learn from them

Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Focus Group

The maths group are still currently looking at the maths progressions. It is worthwhile to go slow and steady so that everyone has a say, and we all gain a greater understanding along the way. In addition, we are looking at the Digital Curriculum for 2020 and we are looking at mapping how far along the continuum teachers seem to be with the implementation of the digital curriculum.

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

Core Education have some fantastic professional development opportunities. A great ‘beginners’ guide to te reo Māori – not just speaking and writing, but how to teach it to others and use it authentically in your setting. This programme explores the basics and you will have the opportunity to engage and discuss content with facilitators and other students in online forums and attend face-to-face hui. See link here

Pakihere rokiroki/ Podcast number 2

Too much noise?

“Lately, researchers have pushed back against cluttered classrooms with too many colours and a barrage of visual stimulus. These classrooms are “too noisy,” making it challenging to focus. But what about actual noise? What about the barrage of sound that can distract students from deep work? If anything, there’s often an emphasis on embracing “noisy learning.” We see it in pithy tweets portraying noisy spaces as more innovative and maker-centered. I recently talked to a principal who said, “If I see a quiet classroom, I’m alarmed. I look for loud classrooms. That’s where the learning is happening.” We often hear that “those who are doing the talking are doing the learning,” and thus classrooms shouldn’t be silent spaces.”

John Spencer looks at the impact of noise on students’ learning. Find the podcast link here.

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING:

Combined board of trustees meeting: 3 July

#18 Weekly Update

Friday, 21 June 2019

Rāmere, te 21 o Pipiri, 2019

Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Ngā mihi o te tau hou Māori Happy Māori new year

Matariki is upon us and we are looking forward to seeing the different ways our kura celebrate this event that is unique to Aotearoa. If you would like photos from your kura included in next week’s update, please send to markralston@silverdaleprimary.school.nz

If you are short of activities or after some new activities for your classroom, here are a couple of links to keep you going:

Te Papa

TKI

Kia pai tō tātou Matariki/ Have a good Matariki

Top tip o te wiki for normalising te reo Māori!:

Most of us have “Kei te pai” (I’m good) as our go to when someone asks us, “Kei te pēhea koe?” (How are you?) With winter underway, how about having a go at expanding our wintery repertoire? Here are some potential options:

Kei te makariri ahau (I’m cold, Maka-rde-rde)

Kei te māuiui ahau (I’m sick, Mar-we-we)

Kei te ngenge ahau (I’m tired, Ngear-Ngear)

If you want to go to the next level with this kiwaha/ idiom:

Kua pau te hau (ku-ar poh teh ho) Run out of oomph, given up the ghost, run out of steam, exhausted, used up – an idiom used to indicate that a person has run out of energy or something no longer works.

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

This is a follow up from last week’s slide regarding Learner Support in the classroom. There are four main ways we can focus on our classroom strategies to assist all learners to achieve their highest potential. There will be a future focus on each area in upcoming newsletters.

Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Group

At our after school leaders meeting this week we held our second across schools moderation round for 2019. There are many benefits from this rich dialogue when teachers get together in professional discussions about student progress and learning. While we do not always have complete agreement with placements, colleagues enrich their knowledge and understanding of the curriculum, learning from each other about teaching, about what student progress and achievement looks like and about assessing learning. Through developing a shared understanding about the Learning Progression Framework, we are developing greater consistency in our professional judgements about progress and achievement and about the quality of that achievement in our writing across our Orewa Kāhui Ako.

Thank you to all teachers’ who took the time to send writing samples in and submit their assessments for the meeting. More detailed results will be shared in our following newsletter.

Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Group

We had a very productive discussion with Jackie Boyd, in-school leader from Silverdale Primary. Jackie discussed the maths pathways and approach adopted by Silverdale teachers. It was interesting to note that, while our individual programmes are different, our delivery is quite similar. Ideas for lessons were readily shared with each other. In addition, Linda and Simon Bentham started to discuss the Digital Curriculum for 2020 and the discussion was centred around the progressions inherent in the curriculum. Next meeting we will look at mapping how far along the continuum teachers seem to be with the implementation of the digital curriculum.

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

This ERO report is part of a series of reports about teaching strategies that work. ERO visited 40 primary schools across New Zealand over the period of one term. These schools were selected because of increased numbers of children achieving at or above the expected standards as they moved through the upper primary years (Years 5 to 8.) In this report, ERO shares the approaches and strategies of five schools that have been effective in ensuring children continue to make progress in writing throughout their primary years.

PODCAST: Professor Dylan Wiliam on the role of research in your classroom

The acclaimed academic offers his thoughts on growth mindset, cognitive load and how research can be used in schools:

Link to podcast

Meeting with Pupuke Kāhui Ako

It was good to meet up with some North Shore colleagues from Pupuke Kāhui Ako. Their focus areas are: key competencies, well being and community links. These are all linked to transitions. We discussed our four focus areas and the work we have done on progressions across our community. We enjoyed sharing and discussing are various strategies and ideas.

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING: