#18 Weekly Update

Friday, 21 June 2019

Rāmere, te 21 o Pipiri, 2019

Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Ngā mihi o te tau hou Māori Happy Māori new year

Matariki is upon us and we are looking forward to seeing the different ways our kura celebrate this event that is unique to Aotearoa. If you would like photos from your kura included in next week’s update, please send to markralston@silverdaleprimary.school.nz

If you are short of activities or after some new activities for your classroom, here are a couple of links to keep you going:

Te Papa

TKI

Kia pai tō tātou Matariki/ Have a good Matariki

Top tip o te wiki for normalising te reo Māori!:

Most of us have “Kei te pai” (I’m good) as our go to when someone asks us, “Kei te pēhea koe?” (How are you?) With winter underway, how about having a go at expanding our wintery repertoire? Here are some potential options:

Kei te makariri ahau (I’m cold, Maka-rde-rde)

Kei te māuiui ahau (I’m sick, Mar-we-we)

Kei te ngenge ahau (I’m tired, Ngear-Ngear)

If you want to go to the next level with this kiwaha/ idiom:

Kua pau te hau (ku-ar poh teh ho) Run out of oomph, given up the ghost, run out of steam, exhausted, used up – an idiom used to indicate that a person has run out of energy or something no longer works.

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

This is a follow up from last week’s slide regarding Learner Support in the classroom. There are four main ways we can focus on our classroom strategies to assist all learners to achieve their highest potential. There will be a future focus on each area in upcoming newsletters.

Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Group

At our after school leaders meeting this week we held our second across schools moderation round for 2019. There are many benefits from this rich dialogue when teachers get together in professional discussions about student progress and learning. While we do not always have complete agreement with placements, colleagues enrich their knowledge and understanding of the curriculum, learning from each other about teaching, about what student progress and achievement looks like and about assessing learning. Through developing a shared understanding about the Learning Progression Framework, we are developing greater consistency in our professional judgements about progress and achievement and about the quality of that achievement in our writing across our Orewa Kāhui Ako.

Thank you to all teachers’ who took the time to send writing samples in and submit their assessments for the meeting. More detailed results will be shared in our following newsletter.

Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Group

We had a very productive discussion with Jackie Boyd, in-school leader from Silverdale Primary. Jackie discussed the maths pathways and approach adopted by Silverdale teachers. It was interesting to note that, while our individual programmes are different, our delivery is quite similar. Ideas for lessons were readily shared with each other. In addition, Linda and Simon Bentham started to discuss the Digital Curriculum for 2020 and the discussion was centred around the progressions inherent in the curriculum. Next meeting we will look at mapping how far along the continuum teachers seem to be with the implementation of the digital curriculum.

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

This ERO report is part of a series of reports about teaching strategies that work. ERO visited 40 primary schools across New Zealand over the period of one term. These schools were selected because of increased numbers of children achieving at or above the expected standards as they moved through the upper primary years (Years 5 to 8.) In this report, ERO shares the approaches and strategies of five schools that have been effective in ensuring children continue to make progress in writing throughout their primary years.

PODCAST: Professor Dylan Wiliam on the role of research in your classroom

The acclaimed academic offers his thoughts on growth mindset, cognitive load and how research can be used in schools:

Link to podcast

Meeting with Pupuke Kāhui Ako

It was good to meet up with some North Shore colleagues from Pupuke Kāhui Ako. Their focus areas are: key competencies, well being and community links. These are all linked to transitions. We discussed our four focus areas and the work we have done on progressions across our community. We enjoyed sharing and discussing are various strategies and ideas.

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING:

#17 Weekly Update

Friday, 14 June 2019

Rāmere, te 14 o Pipiri, 2019

Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori:

Awesome Matariki Mahi toi/ Art for your classroom:

There’s a great art idea in a resource available on line from the Auckland Stardome. It’s a simple yet highly effective technique using chalk pastels that any age student could have success with.

Link:

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Group

Writing moderation

A form for our Term 2 Moderation has been shared with our within school leaders. LPF aspects to be marked against:

  • Creating text for Literary Purposes
  • Vocabulary knowledge
  • Text structure

Please feel free to work individually or submit results with a group of teachers by Wednesday 19th June. Results will be discussed at the 20th June after school leaders’ meeting and then published on our website. Teachers who are interested in this process are welcome to attend.

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

The following chapter from Inclusion in Action (3rd Ed. 2011) edited by Phil Foreman, describes aspects of differentiated curriculum, teaching and the learning environment relevant to the education of all students, including individuals with additional needs.

Effective Teaching Strategies including environment / ecology (link to full chapter)

Highlights:

  • The design and implementation of class programs that meet the needs of all students is a process of differentiation grounded in principles of effective teaching and learning. For all Learners.
  • A range of factors related to the quality of instructional delivery and support of effective teaching and learning. Examples include: pacing, types/amounts of feedback and reinforcement available, prompting strategies, adequate learning time, teacher cueing, questioning, and grouping
  • Classroom management and organisation including the development of classroom routines, seating arrangements and rules
  • The classroom climate – ‘feeling/atmosphere experienced, including This types of teacher expectations, variety of curricular and instructional approaches used in the promotion of learning and the degree of encouragement.
  • Communication processes -variety of ways, listening, video recording, writing, drawing, image description, voice record, have an integral role in the provision of a supportive classroom context.
  • Emphasising the proactive role of the classroom teacher and the importance of understanding the ecology of the individual.
  • The contribution of careful programming and teaching to the prevention of misbehaviour and the development of positive patterns of behaviour.
  • Universal Design for Learning – UDL Meo (2008) describes a four-step process for designing and implementing a curriculum (goals, methods, materials, assessment) that is accessible and effective for all learners and utilises innovative technologies to accommodate individual learner differences.

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

                              UPCOMING:

#16 Weekly Update

Friday, 7 June 2019

Rāmere, te 7 o Pipiri, 2019

Good workplace mental health awareness, wellbeing and mindfulness is associated with improved staff engagement, reduced absenteeism, increased productivity, workplace harmony, improved morale and higher job satisfaction. Mental health first aid is the help given to someone developing a mental health issue, such as depression, anxiety, stress or help for someone who is in a mental health crisis. In last week’s newsletter we wrote about a workshop offered by Dr Sharon Hoover. She mentioned a day long course based on mental health first aid. This is aid given as a first response until appropriate professional treatment is received or until the crisis resolves. Mental health first aid is most relevant in situations when it is first becoming apparent to others that a person in their family, school or community, is developing a mental health problem.

We are investigating this day course as an option to be offered to our Kāhui ako leaders. Here is a link to read more.

Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Top tip o te wiki for normalising te reo Māori!: Te reo Māori/ Sign language talk moves

As a way to further normalise te reo Māori and New Zealand sign language in the classroom, Woody Riley and Mark Ralston explored talk moves in both languages. Rather than use made up or conventional talk move actions, we saw an opportunity to expose students to our other official languages in a real world context. Feel free to watch the video and try these out. I found that teaching a few at a time makes it easier for both the kaiako/ teacher and akonga/ students.

Kia kaha, kia maia, kia manawanui!

Video 3: Talk Moves

Talk moves in Te Reo

Tautoko = Agree

Wero = Challenge

Tāpiria = Add on

Whakaaro Hau=New Idea

Whakauru=Connection/Link

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

The information and tips below can assist students in the development and engagement of speech. It is aimed at Selective Mutism, however it is also relevant for young speakers who are reluctant or may seem delayed. Also, it can assist at any age where there is a lack of confidence to speak up in a class or group discussion, speak directly to an adult or in a pressure situation where anxiety exists. These points can help us remember to consider the classroom environment we create to facilitate a wide variety of needs, responses and requests.

Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Group

Writing moderation

Thank you to teachers who have already sent their narrative writing samples for our across schools week 8 writing moderation. A reminder that samples for our second round of moderation are to be submitted by Monday 10th June. Please see last week’s up date for more details about the set task for assessment.

A moderation form will be sent to all within school leaders by next Thursday 13th June for you to assess against the Learning Progression Frameworks and re-submitted when marked. Results will be discussed at the 20th June after school leaders meeting. Teachers who are interested in this process are welcome to attend.

LPF aspects to be marked against:

  • Creating text for Literary Purposes
  • Vocabulary knowledge
  • Text structure

Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Focus Group

We have discussed growth mindset in our maths group, which consists of teachers from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. A growth mindset emerges from the experience of succeeding after applying a strategy with some effort; from overcoming a barrier. How many of our students feel they have a barrier to understanding school based concepts? Engineering small successes is how you get the mindset for more success. Make success the goal; make it seem possible; show that it’s possible and focus on the effort and habits around practising specific learning activities that you’ve worked out will form the path to excellence in your subject. If you’d like to read more, find the link to the article here

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

10 podcasts to change the way you teach:

Here are links to the most listened-to podcasts from TES’ Podagogy series:

Link to podcasts here

Down the Back of the Chair

Looking for a New Zealand based resource catalogue? Have you had a look at this site? Down the Back of the Chair Username and password: SC25

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING:

#15 Weekly Update

31 May 2019

Rāmere, te 31 o Haratua

We held our Orewa Kāhui Ako leaders after school meeting at Orewa Primary School last Thursday in their new S.T.E.A.M. room. Following the educational approach that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics we were able to look at how Orewa Primary have taken an under utilised area of their school and turned it into a multi purpose learning space. With some classic kiwi ingenuity, clever purchasing, financial support and commitment from their school board of trustees, within school leader Andrew shared their journey so far.

While the classroom is nearing full completion with the installation of sound proofing to improve the acoustics, students have already experienced hands-on learning activities and creative design. Andrew hopes that in time the space will be utilised not only by Orewa Primary students, but the wider community and other Orewa Kāhui Ako schools.

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This is an excellent example of how the Kāhui Ako can work at its best; sharing of ideas, expertise, resources and collaborating with colleagues about the teaching and learning needed for our students to thrive in the 21st century. Simon is happy for schools to contact him if you would like any more information or to set up a visit the classroom.

Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Top tip o te wiki for normalising te reo Māori!:

Have a visual audit

A great TEDTalk came to my attention for the second time today called “Giving mana to Tiriti o Waitangi in our schools”.

One of the key points made by Janelle Riki-Waaka is that we need to ask ourselves the question: “How would I know I am in a school in Aotearoa?”

Part of normalisation is increasing the amount of Māori symbolism and language/ te reo we see in our learning spaces, staff rooms, office spaces, school hall, libraries, outdoor areas and even the view from the street.

It should go beyond a small display in the corner of a room. Māori culture is woven into the fabric of Aotearoa. It sets us apart from the rest of the world. It is a part of who we are and our kura should be, no exception.

Over the next few months, let’s challenge ourselves to look at our own spaces and again ask the question, “How would I know I am in a school in Aotearoa?”

Left: School pepeha displayed outside Wainui School Office. A perfect example.

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

Dr Sharon Hoover

Dr Sharon Hoover is in New Zealand at the invitation of Presbyterian Support Northern, who work with DHBs and other agencies to support children and families. We were delighted to host a presentation at Orewa College on Thursday 30th May where Dr. Hoover shared with us her about her role as a licensed clinical psychologist as an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

She is an expert in school mental health, and bringing evidence based mental health research into real life contexts. Our focus for the afternoon was centred on Dr Hoover sharing current practice and how we can deal with our increasing numbers of students who present with mental health issues.

What skills do we want our students to leave school with?

Her research and practice shows how students are more likely to engage in and follow through with mental health services when offered in schools than in traditional community mental health settings. Like New Zealand, they work in a multi tiered system, working on the mindset of providing interventions early and therefore pre-empting support early to reduce much higher needs later on. People think we need to put our energy into identified mental health, but we actually need to look at the lower end of the scale to stop so much higher level needs.

How can teachers help students who present as anxious in our classrooms? Follow the link here and here to changing minds resources for educators to be trauma responsive.

The workshop was a great chance for us to reflect on our own practices in schools; what is working well, needs to change or develop further in order to best meet the needs of our students.

 

Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Group

Discussion at our last week’s leaders meeting was based on the need for developing cohesion in our expectations across our Kāhui Ako, focussing on the L.P.F. aspects: text structure and communicating knowledge and understanding across the curriculum from NZC Levels 1 -5. Our ‘hunch’ is that students are not making the connection with writing in English and transferring these skills into other subject areas, resulting in poor written responses that do not truly reflect the students’ capabilities. We will begin working on developing tools that can be used to support instruction along the lines of ‘anchor charts’ to build a culture of literacy in the classroom by making thinking—both for the teacher’s and students’—visible while also providing scaffolded expectations across our Kāhui Ako.

Writing moderation

A reminder that our narrative writing samples for our second round of moderation are to be submitted by Monday 10th June.

Photo prompts enlarged

  • Task descriptor – ‘Every picture tells a story. Use your imagination to narrate (tell) a story about the photo.
  • One photo to be selected by either student(s) or teachers from the 3 examples below.
  • No time limits have been set – up to individual teachers. (can be noted in task descriptor.)
  • Time can be given to discuss the prompt, class brainstorm etc
  • Word banks, brainstorms can be used, but noted in task descriptor.
  • No names or year levels
  • Task descriptor at top with photo included
  • Samples can be hand written and scanned or written digitally
  • Writing can be edited for spelling – (encoding will not be assessed)

LPF aspects to be marked against:

  • Creating text for Literary Purposes
  • Vocabulary knowledge
  • Text structure

Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Focus Group

Modernising maths for a changing world. High school mathematics teacher Bernie Wills is revolutionising the way students learn maths, in a bid to better prepare them for the ever-changing workplace. Follow the link here to Education Central for this article.

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

Literacy

Cracking the Spelling Code – Phonics

Professor Tom Nicholson is a specialist in children’s literacy at Massey University’s Institute of Education, Auckland campus. Follow the link here to Education Central for this article.

Hands-on programme raises literacy literacy levels at Auckland’s Sunnybrae Normal School have soared since the introduction of a hands-on programme for new entrants that includes the use of high-frequency word cards and ‘acting out’. Follow the link here to Education Central for this article.

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING:

Weekly Update #14

24 May 2019

Rāmere, te 24 o Haratua

Tēnā koutou kaiako mā

With Matariki coming at us with pace, we have jam packed this issue of our update with practical ideas for the classroom so we can all celebrate the Māori new year with our akonga/ students. What a great opportunity to expose all of our tamariki to Māori experiences in an authentic context. It shows our community that Māori cultural practices, events and knowledge matter and builds the mana of our Māori students.

Across the Kāhui Ako, we all doing great things over Matariki and our in-school leaders are working to ensure we share ideas with each other. If you have ideas that you think are amazing, please share so we can pass them on and make this Matariki one to remember.

The Māori New Year has always been celebrated with the rise of the star cluster Matariki. It marks the beginning of the Aotearoa/ Pacific New Year according to the lunar calendar. In 2019, the stars set on 27 Haratua / May, and rise 25-28 Pipiri / June 2019.

Christchurch City Library

Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Matariki is one of the important dates on the Māori calendar so why not consider inviting whānau and our wider community to participate in activities such as kite building, waiata or shared kai?

Waiata/ songs:

Matariki Macarena: This is sung to the tune of the “Macarena” and is one of my favourite waiata of all time. The kids love it no matter what age! This is a great way to learn the names of the stars/ sisters too. The actions are the same as the macarena for the girls which makes it easier. The tama/ boys actions are more of a haka. This video runs through the whole thing for you and you can do it without a guitar. I start slow and speed up as we go.

Mahi toi/ Art:

A folder full of Art/Mahi Toi resources

Credit to Suzy Carnachan for compiling this

MANU TUKUTUKU – KITE MAKING – Kite making is a great way to talk about tikanga Māori in relation to harvesting harakeke/ flax. These activities are a great opportunity to invite whānau in to participate. The more hands on board the merrier.

Links:

The tikanga of harakeke – Dowse Art Museum

Christchurch Library – Loads of resources

TKI

Extra taonga/treasures:

We will go over nga kupu at our next hui.

Fortune teller Matariki

Matariki Cards

Credit to Caroline Dunn for finding this

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Group

Matariki 2018 teaching resource – English and mātauranga Māori

Te Papa have developed two comprehensive teaching resources, one in English and one in mātauranga Māori with reo translation, to support your students’ learning about Matariki in school. These resources use our rich online collections so students can explore taonga and their stories, and explore themes of renewal and innovation within Matariki.

Matariki storytelling – Kōrero pūrakāu o Matariki This resource provides educators with ideas and activities for early childhood and primary classrooms. Storytelling in the whare tapere (Māori house of entertainment) is the focus of Part 1. Part 2 explores storytelling through dance, and Part 3 gives tools for storytelling through visual arts.

Twinkl resources for primary students – have a look at these resources to support your programmes. A few are free, most you need a subscription.

NZ History site offers some ideas for older students to write literary responses to Matariki prompts as part of the Social Sciences curriculum.

Experiencing Poetry through Matariki A comprehensive resource for Levels 2 -6 of the curriculum, focusing mainly on English but does cross over into other curriculum areas.

Matariki plan New Entrants – Level 1. A comprehensive Social Sciences / English plan.

Focus questions: Why is Matariki important to New Zealanders? How do people celebrate Matariki?

MATARIKI AND JUNE DAILY WRITING PROMPTS

This resource includes 38 Matariki and June daily writing prompts in three formats: PowerPoints, Journals, and Worksheets. You can choose the ones that suit your class best! Cost NZ $4 Seven kites of Matariki – Scholastic plan

Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Focus Group

Looking for a maths based Matariki activity? Look no further:

Take the constellation of Matariki and see how many different patterns or shapes you can draw by connecting the lines. Link it to star signs too. This is open ended and there is no right answer. The only rule is, lines must be ruled straight from one star to another.

NZ Maths also has an activity that looks at polygons that can be formed in the constellation. You can then extend this activity by talking about the debate around there being 9 stars in the cluster. Then look at patterns that occur in the number of polygons everytime you add one star.

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

There are some great articles, video clips and resources available on TKI promoting and supporting the teaching of Māori History. It’s well worth taking the time to explore these and develop their use in our kura/ schools and akomanga/ classrooms. One such resource is Te Takanga o te Wā – Māori History Guidelines For Years 1-8

Professional Reading

 

 

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING:

Weekly Update #13

17 May 2019

Rāmere, te 17 o Haratua

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

Dyslexia has many varied definitions and meanings. This tip box should help you understand how you can help students with dyslexia in your classroom. Remember all strategies you use could help anyone in your classroom – this is called UDL – Universal Design for Learning.

Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Group

Writing moderation: Thursday 20th June, 3.30 pm Orewa College. In case you missed it, here are the details regarding this second round of moderation:

At our final Kāhui Ako Leaders meeting at the end of Term 1 we discussed the format for our #2 moderation meeting. Narrative writing was selected with students having an element of choice and agency by selecting their own photo prompt from the examples given. Alternatively teachers could also make the selection. Once we have information of the preferred prompt chosen by the majority of students, we will then select a range of samples on this prompt from across the schools. Our thinking behind providing the photos for selection is so we can see the progression in writing across curriculum levels, of a given idea.

Please contact Sandy Blackburn if you have any queries or would like to use the templates I have created for Wainui School.

Photo prompts enlarged

  • Task descriptor –‘Every picture tells a story. Use your imagination to narrate (tell) a story about the photo.
  • One photo to be selected by either student(s) or teachers from the 3 examples below.
  • No time limits have been set – up to individual teachers. (can be noted in task descriptor.)
  • Time can be given to discuss the prompt, class brainstorm etc
  • Word banks, brainstorms can be used, but noted in task descriptor.

 

Samples submitted for moderation by Monday 10th June

  • No names or year levels
  • Task descriptor at top with photo included
  • Samples can be hand written and scanned or written digitally
  • Writing can be edited for spelling – (encoding will not be assessed)

LPF aspects to be marked against:

  • Creating text for Literary Purposes
  • Vocabulary knowledge
  • Text structure

Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Focus Group

For this week’s meeting we will all be assembling in Orewa Primary’s STEAM room. (That is, Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Maths room.) Although this room is still in the process of being developed, it is functional and we are excited to be able to use this innovative and experimental space. We will be doing some practical maths tasks in our discussion on the LPFs. This will also lead us naturally into a discussion about the digital curriculum progressions.

Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Top tip o te wiki for normalising te reo Māori!:

Attention Grabbers

All of us have a range of strategies to gain the attention of our students. What a great opportunity to regularly normalise the use of te reo Māori within our kura.

Here are a few that work:

  • Teacher: “Tahi, rua, toru whā”
  • Students: “I aue hī” (E o-way he)
  • Teacher: “Tihei” (Tee-hey)
  • Students: “Mauri Ora!” (Mow-rde ore-rda)
  • Teacher: “Taringa” (Tar-rdinga)
  • Students: “Whakarongo” (Whaka-rdong-or)
  • Teacher: “Tahi, rua, toru whā”
  • Students: “Rima! “

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

Tips for dealing with Dyslexia

This online resource is fantastic. It provides techniques which you can use with any student in your class to promote learning (UDL – Universal Design for Learning) but is specifically helpful for students with Dyslexia. It provides a few tips in an easy, one scroll page format for:

  • Beginner readers and writers
  • Before, during and after reading
  • Oral reading
  • General recommendations
  • Learning vocabulary
  • Connecting sounds
  • Visual defects

 

Ngaio pukapuka kōrero/ Professional Development

INTERFACEXpo is a free event for people who make and influence the decisions about the direction and implementation of digital technology solutions at their school. To register your interest to attend the Auckland event in 2019, fill in your details below.

Link to register here

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

UPCOMING:

Weekly Update #12

10 May 2019

Rāmere, te 10 o Haratua

Rōpū Taunaki Ako/ Learning Support Group

Our Learner support register is just about up and running. Final tests are being done on it this week. It’s purpose is to:

a) have a common place to record and monitor learner needs,

b) collate data to get assistance for our learners,

c) provide quicker, smoother information for transition stages between schools.

All students in our Kāhui Ako will soon be given a letter for permission to be placed on the register – if and when any level of learner support is required. In future this permission letter will become part our enrolment processes.

Rōpū Tuhituhi / Writing Group

During Term 2 the writing group will begin to look at the skill set that students need to be successful writers across the New Zealand Curriculum in levels 1 -5. We will look at the curriculum areas of English, Science and Social Sciences to see the subject specific requirements in each subject area, and the links that naturally occur in writing. Using the Learning Progression Framework to guide us, we will begin to work on developing an overview across levels of explicit skills required.

Writing moderation: Thursday 20th June, 3.30 pm Orewa College. Please refer to last week’s update for details for our Term 2 moderation.

Rōpū Pāngarau/ Maths Focus Group

In term 2, this group will continue the discussion about the maths LPFs. Our goal is to work on understanding the maths progressions, as well as striving for consistency in our maths programmes. At the next meeting, we will discuss and work on the pathways inherent in the 2020 Digital Curriculum. Linda will share resources with the group. These resources will be made available to the whole community as we shift our focus from solely looking at the LPFs, to the digital curriculum.

Rōpū Te Reo Me Tikanga Māori

Top tip o te wiki for normalising te reo Māori!:

Whakataukī/Proverbs

Whakataukī are a great way to integrate te reo Māori into your akomanga/classroom. They can be used to reinforce school values, provide insight into Māori values, reinforce a message being conveyed to others.

For Māori they are very important and a taonga/treasure. These nuggets of knowledge are passed down from tupuna/ancestors from generation to generation to be used to guide our lives today.

Ways to use whakataukī in your practice:

  1. Choose whakataukī that align to your school values or growth mindset and allow students to work out meaning before giving them the answers
  2. Add a whakatauki to your email sign off
  3. Have a team whakatauki a class whakataukī or even a personal whakataukī that you live by
  4. One teacher in our team writes a whakataukī on her board and says nothing. She finds this evokes discussion on its own.
  5. When problems arise in you classroom, use a whakataukī as a pathway to a solution
  6. Use whakataukī to backup a point you are making when delivering professional development

Here are some whakataukī, although there are some beautifully displayed whakataukī online. If you want more follow this link:

He waka eke noa

 

A canoe which we are all in with no exception

Waiho i te toipoto, kaua i te toiroa

Let us keep close together not far apart

I orea te tuatara ka patu ki waho.mp3

A problem is solved by continuing to find solutions

Whaowhia te kete mātauranga.mp3

Fill the basket of knowledge

Ko ia kāhore nei i rapu, tē kitea.mp3

He who does not seek will not find

Whāia te mātauranga hei oranga mō koutou.mp3

Seek after learning for the sake of your wellbeing

 

Pānui ngaio/ Professional Reading

The video above and the excerpts below are from an American teacher, who is also a parent. In it, he reminds us that even though our job as teachers can be challenging, we are in fact making a difference. And he also shows appreciation for all that we do.

A few years ago, my daughter entered kindergarten. She came in knowing letters but that was about it. By the end of the year, she could put together entire words. She viewed language as a playground and reading as a chance to explore a whole world. I don’t completely understand the science of blending and phonics and sight words. But you do.

Miraculously, millions of students learn to read every day.

Because of a teacher.

There’s a maths teacher who has a room full of kids started the year saying that they’re “just not good at maths.” But now they are geeking out over ways to solve complex problems. They are learning that math can be creative and even fun. And they will become problem-solvers.

Because of a teacher.

There’s a science teacher who inspires her students to chase after their questions and on one afternoon they were so excited about their experiments that they didn’t even notice the bell ring. They will become scientists.

Because of a teacher.

There are history teachers who inspire students to capture history and a group of PE teachers who will encourage kids to get more active and think about their health. There are technology teachers who will help kids send their work to the world and fine arts teachers who help kids find their creative voice. There are foreign language teachers who are helping kids communicate globally and careers teachers who will help prepare kids for all kinds of jobs.

There’s a special education teacher inspiring her kids to do things that once seemed impossible. She’s building partnerships with the families out of a belief that all children can learn.

So, if you’re a teacher, I just want to say thank you for all you do even when the job is challenging and exhausting. You’re making a huge difference. Every single day.

Ngaio pukapuka kōrero/ Professional Development

INTERFACEXpo is a free event for people who make and influence the decisions about the direction and implementation of digital technology solutions at their school. To register your interest to attend the Auckland event in 2019, fill in your details below.

Link to register here

To keep up to date, follow us on our Kāhui Ako website: https://orewakahuiako.com/

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